My name is Ryan, and I am one of the terrible things.

(It's worth noting that I reblog a decent amount of nsfw stuff. I try to keep it relatively tame...mostly.)

26th July 2014

Video reblogged from You’re as beautiful as endless with 91,730 notes

makochantachibanana:

inktail:

rairii:

Great Dane puppy voices his displeasure at being forced to get up early

This dog understands me and my feelings about mornings

thats a lot of sass for one puppy

Thor is my life bless him

Source: videohall

15th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Project Habu with 50 notes

projecthabu:

July 14, 2014

     Today, I attended the launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.1 rocket, launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. This launch carried six Orbcomm Generation 2 communication satellites into orbit. So far, in Project Habu, I’ve only covered aircraft and spacecraft which are firmly attached to the ground in museum static displays. This is the first article that I’ve shared which actually displays an object in flight. I thought this was appropriate, because SpaceX rockets are truly paving the way for modern spaceflight systems and are certainly not destined for museum duty any time soon. 

     This marked the 10th launch of the Falcon 9 system, but the first launch for me. Before this, I’d never seen a launch. Things hadn’t timed out quite right until now. But finally, here I was. The event was spectacular. Perfect.

     I arrived at the Kennedy Space Center facility early in the morning, and traveled to the Banana Creek Viewing Site, positioned 6.3 miles away from SpaceX’s Launch Complex 40. After a brief delay, the countdown progressed, and our rocket took flight. I was caught up in the emotions of the moment, but I remember every thought that came during the launch sequence.

     First, I remember seeing the steam cloud generated by the water deluge system erupting away from the pad as the rockets ignited. Then, a bright plume appeared under the rocket as it crept away from the pad. The rocket seemed to move slowly at first; almost too slowly. I wanted to urge it forward.

     Eventually, she rose above the launch tower, and the full exhaust plume was visible, which doubled the length of the rocket. Still, while witnessing all this drama, there was no sound. The rocket rose, and followed a precise path, as if riding invisible rails, quickly accelerating.

     As the rocket rose further, she disappeared behind a large cloud. I took the opportunity to double-check camera settings, and expose for this different angle, pointed nearly directly toward the sun. As the rocket emerged from behind the cloud, we saw that she had finally started producing a beautiful contrail. Then, 30 seconds after liftoff, the sound finally hit us. The deep, thunderous growl shook my body, and suddenly this all became real. I was watching a rocket launch. This brought a tear to my eye, but there was no time to waste. I had to keep shooting photos.

     While the contrail was crossing in front of the sun, I looked down at the launch complex, which was shrouded in the quickly dispersing steam cloud produced during the early moments of liftoff. Eventually, I saw the contrail pass through the sun, and continue on. The contrail was much smaller at this point, which gave a wonderful perspective of how far away the rocket was now.

     The sound remained long after the launch vehicle was out of sight. I just stood and gazed toward the water, listening to that growl fade into the sky, taking it all in. So much, in such little time. This is what it was like to live a dream, to finally see a launch, like I’d wanted since before I remember.

15th July 2014

Photo reblogged from I would love to love you, lover with 66,553 notes

rlyhigh:

this fake relationship fucked me up mentally

rlyhigh:

this fake relationship fucked me up mentally

Source: sighings

15th July 2014

Photo reblogged from On the Road with 3,347 notes

afro-dominicano:


Iridium 52
While hunting for meteors in the night sky above the White Mountains near Bishop, California, astrophotographer James Young instead captured this brilliant celestial apparition. Recorded near twilight on August 13, the bright streak is not the flash of a meteor trail but sunlight glinting from a satellite.
Credit: J. W. Young ( TMO, JPL, NASA)

afro-dominicano:

Iridium 52

While hunting for meteors in the night sky above the White Mountains near Bishop, California, astrophotographer James Young instead captured this brilliant celestial apparition. Recorded near twilight on August 13, the bright streak is not the flash of a meteor trail but sunlight glinting from a satellite.

Credit: J. W. Young ( TMO, JPL, NASA)

Source: afro-dominicano

15th July 2014

Post reblogged from pizza ✌ with 349,344 notes

thatonepleb:

Me trying to finish something important on time:

image

Source: thatonepleb

15th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Neuroscience with 539 notes

neurosciencestuff:

Months before their first words, babies’ brains rehearse speech mechanics
Infants can tell the difference between sounds of all languages until about 8 months of age when their brains start to focus only on the sounds they hear around them. It’s been unclear how this transition occurs, but social interactions and caregivers’ use of exaggerated “parentese” style of speech seem to help.
University of Washington research in 7- and 11-month-old infants shows that speech sounds stimulate areas of the brain that coordinate and plan motor movements for speech.
The study, published July 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that baby brains start laying down the groundwork of how to form words long before they actually begin to speak, and this may affect the developmental transition.
“Most babies babble by 7 months, but don’t utter their first words until after their first birthdays,” said lead author Patricia Kuhl, who is the co-director of the UW’s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences. “Finding activation in motor areas of the brain when infants are simply listening is significant, because it means the baby brain is engaged in trying to talk back right from the start and suggests that 7-month-olds’ brains are already trying to figure out how to make the right movements that will produce words.”
Kuhl and her research team believe this practice at motor planning contributes to the transition when infants become more sensitive to their native language.
The results emphasize the importance of talking to kids during social interactions even if they aren’t talking back yet.
“Hearing us talk exercises the action areas of infants’ brains, going beyond what we thought happens when we talk to them,” Kuhl said. “Infants’ brains are preparing them to act on the world by practicing how to speak before they actually say a word.”
In the experiment, infants sat in a brain scanner that measures brain activation through a noninvasive technique called magnetoencephalography. Nicknamed MEG, the brain scanner resembles an egg-shaped vintage hair dryer and is completely safe for infants. The Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences was the first in the world to use such a tool to study babies while they engaged in a task.
The babies, 57 7- and 11- or 12-month-olds, each listened to a series of native and foreign language syllables such as “da” and “ta” as researchers recorded brain responses. They listened to sounds in English and in Spanish.
The researchers observed brain activity in an auditory area of the brain called the superior temporal gyrus, as well as in Broca’s area and the cerebellum, cortical regions responsible for planning the motor movements required for producing speech.
This pattern of brain activation occurred for sounds in the 7-month-olds’ native language (English) as well as in a non-native language (Spanish), showing that at this early age infants are responding to all speech sounds, whether or not they have heard the sounds before.
In the older infants, brain activation was different. By 11-12 months, infants’ brains increase motor activation to the non-native speech sounds relative to native speech, which the researchers interpret as showing that it takes more effort for the baby brain to predict which movements create non-native speech. This reflects an effect of experience between 7 and 11 months, and suggests that activation in motor brain areas is contributing to the transition in early speech perception.
The study has social implications, suggesting that the slow and exaggerated parentese speech – “Hiiiii! How are youuuuu?” – may actually prompt infants to try to synthesize utterances themselves and imitate what they heard, uttering something like “Ahhh bah bah baaah.”
“Parentese is very exaggerated, and when infants hear it, their brains may find it easier to model the motor movements necessary to speak,” Kuhl said.

neurosciencestuff:

Months before their first words, babies’ brains rehearse speech mechanics

Infants can tell the difference between sounds of all languages until about 8 months of age when their brains start to focus only on the sounds they hear around them. It’s been unclear how this transition occurs, but social interactions and caregivers’ use of exaggerated “parentese” style of speech seem to help.

University of Washington research in 7- and 11-month-old infants shows that speech sounds stimulate areas of the brain that coordinate and plan motor movements for speech.

The study, published July 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that baby brains start laying down the groundwork of how to form words long before they actually begin to speak, and this may affect the developmental transition.

“Most babies babble by 7 months, but don’t utter their first words until after their first birthdays,” said lead author Patricia Kuhl, who is the co-director of the UW’s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences. “Finding activation in motor areas of the brain when infants are simply listening is significant, because it means the baby brain is engaged in trying to talk back right from the start and suggests that 7-month-olds’ brains are already trying to figure out how to make the right movements that will produce words.”

Kuhl and her research team believe this practice at motor planning contributes to the transition when infants become more sensitive to their native language.

The results emphasize the importance of talking to kids during social interactions even if they aren’t talking back yet.

“Hearing us talk exercises the action areas of infants’ brains, going beyond what we thought happens when we talk to them,” Kuhl said. “Infants’ brains are preparing them to act on the world by practicing how to speak before they actually say a word.”

In the experiment, infants sat in a brain scanner that measures brain activation through a noninvasive technique called magnetoencephalography. Nicknamed MEG, the brain scanner resembles an egg-shaped vintage hair dryer and is completely safe for infants. The Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences was the first in the world to use such a tool to study babies while they engaged in a task.

The babies, 57 7- and 11- or 12-month-olds, each listened to a series of native and foreign language syllables such as “da” and “ta” as researchers recorded brain responses. They listened to sounds in English and in Spanish.

The researchers observed brain activity in an auditory area of the brain called the superior temporal gyrus, as well as in Broca’s area and the cerebellum, cortical regions responsible for planning the motor movements required for producing speech.

This pattern of brain activation occurred for sounds in the 7-month-olds’ native language (English) as well as in a non-native language (Spanish), showing that at this early age infants are responding to all speech sounds, whether or not they have heard the sounds before.

In the older infants, brain activation was different. By 11-12 months, infants’ brains increase motor activation to the non-native speech sounds relative to native speech, which the researchers interpret as showing that it takes more effort for the baby brain to predict which movements create non-native speech. This reflects an effect of experience between 7 and 11 months, and suggests that activation in motor brain areas is contributing to the transition in early speech perception.

The study has social implications, suggesting that the slow and exaggerated parentese speech – “Hiiiii! How are youuuuu?” – may actually prompt infants to try to synthesize utterances themselves and imitate what they heard, uttering something like “Ahhh bah bah baaah.”

“Parentese is very exaggerated, and when infants hear it, their brains may find it easier to model the motor movements necessary to speak,” Kuhl said.

15th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Só a liberdade transforma with 231,202 notes

michiganprepster:

This is so beautiful!!!

Source: wonderous-world

15th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from doginator 3000 with 241,956 notes

Source: glramseys

15th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Memewhore with 53,523 notes

4th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Allefory with 184,053 notes

allefory:

ashleyisnt:

ladyhistory:

Even more captioned adventures of George Washington.

PART I | PART II | PART III | PART IV

Let me touch your books.

AW YISS ‘MERICA

Source: ladyhistory

4th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from StarStuff with 1,597 notes

projecthabu:

     After 306 days, 14 hours, 12 minutes and 43 seconds of flight, over the span of 33 missions, Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, OV-104, on display at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Titusville, Florida, is now the centerpiece of the most breathtaking aerospace museum presentation I’ve ever visited.

     This orbiter flew many relatively important missions, including the final Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission in 2009. STS-125 performed five EVAs during the mission, and restored the important telescope, extending its life well beyond original design spec.

     It’s truly surreal to walk up right beside this enormous rocket plane. I found it difficult to take the whole thing in at once. It’s overwhelming in a really good way. I wrote more about the experience, and shared several more photos in a previous post (click here to view).

Source: projecthabu

4th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Raeden Zen with 927 notes

Source: tumbrloslav

4th July 2014

Photo reblogged from StarStuff with 115 notes

gravitationalbeauty:

Southern Saturn from Cassini

gravitationalbeauty:

Southern Saturn from Cassini

Source: gravitationalbeauty

4th July 2014

Photo reblogged from StarStuff with 234 notes

spaceexp:

Uranian Moon Miranda, as seen in 1986 by Voyager 2.

spaceexp:

Uranian Moon Miranda, as seen in 1986 by Voyager 2.

Source: spaceexp

4th July 2014

Photo reblogged from StarStuff with 242 notes

astronomybird:

Stephan’s Quintet Plus One

astronomybird:

Stephan’s Quintet Plus One

Source: astronomybird